Ice Isn’t Melting in the Arctic and Antarctic, Yet Big Insurance Rate Hikes on Coastal Properties Loom for Purported Sea Level Rise

By Thomas Lifson

Global warming has a big problem: its predictions of doom have consistently failed to generate any serious pain. Yes, they blame hot weather in the summer in global warming, and if there are hurricanes, they must be caused by “climate change,” though when we have a year with few hurricanes, or, as in 2018 no tornadoes at all, nobody sings the praises of the benefits of “climate change.”

But they’ve hit a gold mine with their predictions of island nations being sunk beneath the waves, and coastal communities (especially in rich countries) forced to be abandoned. Their institutional clout is considerable, as they have Big Science, Big Education, Big Government, and Big Business all on board with their scheme to extract money from people for the crime of using energy (while exempting wealthy members of their elite from the strictures). Especially when there’s money to be made from fear-mongering.

Read more: https://www.americanthinker.com/blog/2018/12/ice_isnt_melting_in_the_arctic_and_antarctic_yet_big_insurance_rate_hikes_on_coastal_properties_loom_for_purported_sea_level_rise_.html

One thought on “Ice Isn’t Melting in the Arctic and Antarctic, Yet Big Insurance Rate Hikes on Coastal Properties Loom for Purported Sea Level Rise”

  1. I wonder about sea levels. How do we know if the sea level is rising or the land sinking? What is the ultimate reference point? We float on tectonic plates, the plate Australia sits on is moving northward, and dipping under its more northern Asian plate, casing earthquakes and volcanic activity in Indonesia and ultimately causing Everest to rise.
    Why the variations in reported sea level rises around the world. Shouldn’t these all eventually even out. It is claimed that the sea level around Manhattan has risen 10cm (since when?). But perhaps Manhattan is sinking, due to natural causes and due to the weight of infrastructure and drainage changes on what is effectively an island.
    Do we have a decent reference point to measure base values of rise or fall?

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