HUMAN-INDUCED CLIMATE CHANGE – A Geoscientist’s View

Consultant geologist Dr Geoff Derrick was invited to present this talk to a conference held in Brisbane at the Pullman Hotel, 22-23 July 2019. The conference was organised and hosted by DANA, a New Zealand-based group of Forest Industry Advisors. The conference was titled “Innovations in the Australian Forest Industry Sector”, and featured 2 days of lectures and workshop discussion, followed by a half-day field trip to Woodchip export facilities at the Port of Brisbane. Continue reading “HUMAN-INDUCED CLIMATE CHANGE – A Geoscientist’s View”

Trees, Fires, Climate and Carbon Dioxide

By Jim Steele. Published in Pacifica. Tribune August 20, 2019

There are too many fear mongering politicians pushing an “existential climate crisis”. I find the climate history told by the trees far more trustworthy, and the trees are whispering there is no crisis.

This summer I taught a class on the Natural History of the Sierra Nevada for San Francisco State University’s Sierra Nevada Field Campus. The first day we taught students how to identify the trees. Once students know their trees, they can easily see how tree species vary with elevation, temperature, moisture, and snow pack. They can see which species colonize open sunny areas and which trees need shade before they can invade. Old time naturalists used trees to identify “life-zones” where different species of mammals, birds, insects and other plants can be found. Furthermore, when you listen to the trees, you can see change.

The class explored forests along the North Yuba River. Free from politics, trees tell us about changes in fire frequency, logging, climate change and ecosystem resilience. Photographs taken during the late 1800s during California’s gold rush days, revealed the total devastation of local forests. Gold miners needed wood for heating and cooking, for their metal forges, and for timbers to reinforce their mines. They needed wood to build flume boxes that altered river courses to expose riverbeds. Flume boxes also carried water from high to low elevations where giant water cannons completely washed away hillsides in their search for gold.

Read more:

http://landscapesandcycles.net/listen-to-the-trees.html

Plant More Trees and Fly More Often – The Earth Needs More Carbon Dioxide

By Dr. John Happs

The 1997 climate treaty known as the Kyoto Protocol allows wealthy countries to count carbon storage in forests towards their targets for limiting greenhouse-gas emissions.

https://unfccc.int/process-and-meetings/the-paris-agreement/the-paris-agreement

We often hear about various environmental groups that are intent on planting as many trees as possible, supposedly to offset anthropogenic carbon dioxide emissions. The Australian Government has described carbon offsetting as:

An activity, process, organisation, event, building or precinct is carbon neutral when its net greenhouse gas emissions (emissions) are equal to zero. To become carbon neutral, entities must calculate their emissions, reduce these emissions as much as possible, and then purchase and cancel carbon offsets or carbon credits equivalent to the remaining emissions. This process results in emissions being offset and leads to net zero emissions or being carbon neutral.”

https://www.environment.gov.au/climate-change/government/carbon-neutral/ncos-eligible-offsets

Continue reading “Plant More Trees and Fly More Often – The Earth Needs More Carbon Dioxide”

How Weather and Climate Work

By Viv Forbes

Source: https://www.americanthinker.com/articles/2018/04/how_weather_and_climate_work.html

There are three big drivers of weather for any place on Earth: the latitude, the local environment, and solar system cycles.

The biggest weather factor is latitude – are you in the torrid, temperate, or frigid zone? These climatic zones are defined by the intensity of heat delivered to Earth’s surface by the sun.

In the Torrid Zone, the sun is always high in the sky. It is generally hot, often moist, with low atmospheric pressure, muggy conditions, and abundant rain and storms, some severe. Places close to the Equator get two summers per year (just one long summer) and very little winter. Farther from the equator, there are two seasons: “The Wet” and “The Dry.” The Torrid Zone produces many equatorial rainforests and also contains some deserts. Most people dream of vacations or retirement in the warm zone.
Continue reading “How Weather and Climate Work”